These are the remains of three young adults, a teenager and a boy of about seven. They have appeared of Jebel about a hundred kilometers from Marrakesh in western Morocco. They are about 315 thousand years old. The most extraordinary thing is that, with its modern face and its fine jaw, they belong unequivocally to the lineage of Homo sapiens. The discovery, presented this week in the journal Nature, sheds light on the origin of our species, one of the most important and least known episodes of human evolution.

Homo sapiens

The authors of the find were an international research team led by Jean-Jacques Hublin of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and another by Abdelouahed Ben-Ncer of the National Institute of Archeology and Heritage.

The findings exceed 300,000 years and represent the oldest fossil evidence of the human species, according to the authors. These Homo sapiens lived 100,000 years before the earliest fossils found to date. The discoveries reveal a complex evolutionary history of humanity that probably involved the entire African continent.

Both the genetic data of modern humans the fossil remains point to an African origin of ‘Homo sapiens’. Previously, the earliest and securely dated fossils of this species were known from the site of Omo Kibish in Ethiopia dated 195,000 years ago. In Herto, also in Ethiopia, a fossil ‘Homo sapiens’ is dated 160,000 years ago.

So far, most researchers believed that all humans living today descended from a population living in East Africa about 200,000 years ago. “We used to think that there was a cradle of humanity about two thousand centuries ago in East Africa, but our new data reveal that ‘Homo sapiens’ spread throughout the African continent some 300 thousand years ago.

Long before the dispersion outside Africa of ‘Homo sapiens’, there was dispersion within Africa, says paleoanthropologist Jean-Jacques Hublin. These findings confirm the importance of Jebel Irhoud as the oldest and richest hominid site of the Stone Age Middle Ages in Africa an early stage of our species. Jebel Irhoud’s fossil remains comprise skulls, teeth and long bones of at least five individuals.

http://www.thetechnologylounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Homo-sapiens.pnghttp://www.thetechnologylounge.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Homo-sapiens-150x150.pngAmmanSciencefirst human in the world,first person on earth,homosapien
These are the remains of three young adults, a teenager and a boy of about seven. They have appeared of Jebel about a hundred kilometers from Marrakesh in western Morocco. They are about 315 thousand years old. The most extraordinary thing is that, with its modern face and its...