Harvard University has managed to store energy in liquids, but at the moment they do not have a real application. There is still no short-term substitute for lithium in our device batteries. Everyone is looking for an innovation that allows them to dispose of lithium-ion batteries and get mobiles, computers and other devices with a longer life and a longer life.

Liquid batteries

Now, no one has found the key or the necessary mineral but attempts are still being made. Although many of us think only of our phone when we curse battery life there are other areas where this lack of a more efficient and long-term energy storage system is a major problem.  For example, for clean energies (wind or solar).Hence, Harvard University is experimenting with batteries that store energy in conductive liquids. These batteries on paper can last for 10 years without much degradation and are very stable something that cannot be said of ‘lithium-ion’ batteries.

The liquid in question is soluble in water, which only causes the liquid to lose 1% of its capacity after 1000 cycles of loading and unloading, it has a very long shelf life, but it is good for the environment it is non-toxic and if there was a leak passing. The mop would be enough to pick it up and reuse it. The problem as with every new battery system that is researched and invented is that there are no plans in the medium or long term to launch it as a real substitute for the batteries we already use.

Science fiction has been worrying about the dangers of the development of artificial intelligence (AI) for decades but it has only been possible until recently to create virtual minds. It is normal that now those who raise the voice to speak of these dangers are people of prestige like Stephen Hawking.

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Harvard University has managed to store energy in liquids, but at the moment they do not have a real application. There is still no short-term substitute for lithium in our device batteries. Everyone is looking for an innovation that allows them to dispose of lithium-ion batteries and get mobiles,...